Paul’s background for Environment Matters: Three Habitats of Song and Music

                I have been a teacher in a variety of settings from elementary school to the graduate seminar, and have conducted research on topics ranging from Roman tomb inscriptions to non-rational ways of knowing to the history of higher education.   And although this has meant that I spend a great deal of time in Habitat Two, I am vitally interested in both of the other habitats, which is where I expect to be occupying myself increasingly in the future.   This project has been an opportunity to ask questions about the relationship among environment, sensory input, creativity and religious experience (among others), and to work towards new ways of thinking about how we define and understand music.   Rather than claiming to be revisionists in the academic discipline of musicology, Lynn and I hope to supplement the current understanding of the environmental history of music by calling attention to the complexity and richness of the settings in which music has always been made—as well as to the radical changes now upon us with the arrival of electronic sound generation.

            The choice of the word “habitat” to characterize these settings is intended to be neither catchy nor provocative, but instead to be taken almost literally.  These are places where music has lived and interacted with the physical world, whether human-made or natural, and where the auditors of this music were also touched by the objects and forces around them.   And as we come to understand more completely the story of this interaction, we will be better able to appreciate the experience of music in the ways it can be made today.    


Selected Publications  

Shore, P. J. (2012).  Narratives of Adversity: Jesuits on the Eastern Periphery of the Habsburg Realms (1640-1773).  Budapest: Central European University Press.

Shore, P. J. (2012). "In Carcere; ad Supplicium": Jesuit Encounters in Prison and in Places of Execution; Reflections on the Early Modern Period and Today.  European Review of History 19, 2, 183-200.

Grba, Milan and Shore, P. J. (2010). A Recently Identified Seventeenth Century Romanian Catechism in the British Library. Valahian Journal of Historical Studies 13, 7-10. 

Shore, P. J. (2008). The Life and Death of a Jesuit Mission: The Collegium in Uzhgorod, Transcarpathia (1650–1773).  Slavonic and East European Review 18, 4, 601-633. 

Shore P. J. (2006).  Midwifery Education at the Prague University in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.  Kosmas 21, 1, 27-39.

Murdick, N., Shore, P., Chittooran, M., & Gartin, B. (2004). The concept of otherness in three different countries and its impact on persons with disabilities. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 39, 4, 310-316.

Shore, P. J. (2002).  The Eagle and the Cross: Jesuits in Late Baroque Prague. St. Louis: The Institute of Jesuit Sources.

Shore, P. J.  (1997). Rest lightly:  A Collection of Latin and Greek tomb Inscriptions. Mundelein, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci.

Shore, P. J., Bader, A., and Rosner, R. (1999).  Anti-Semitism, Tolerance and Politics at the University of Vienna.  Mitteilungen der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Wissenschaftsgeschichte 19, 1-18.

Shore, P. J. (1999).  The message and the messenger:  The untold story of Claude Heithaus, SJ and the integration of Saint Louis University, in Trying times: Essays on American Catholic higher education in the twentieth century. W. Shea, ed. Atlanta: Scholars Press.  139-152.

Mirow, M.C., and P. J. Shore (1997). Plagiarism and Textual Ownership in the Digital Source Environment. Proteus 14, 1 41-43.

Noddings, N. and Shore, P. J. (1984).  Awakening the Inner Eye:  Intuition in Education. New York: Teachers College Press.